NIH SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP AWARDS

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Bone Zone

Grant Website

Archived website

Abstract

Found in gravesites. Buried in the backyard. Lurking and scaring neighbors at Halloween. The stuff of legendary Hollywood horror films. But, in reality, bones are so much more. They are the living, growing framework of life.

Bone Zone, a dynamic traveling exhibit to be developed by the Children's Museum of Indianapolis, will let visitors explore the mystery inside the body so long hidden by skin, fur or other outside covering. By capitalizing on the fact that visitors bring a portion of the exhibit into the gallery with them (their own bones), these visitors will learn that they too have bones and that their bones live and grow along with them.

A great need for this type of exhibit exists because most people do not identify the skeleton as one of the body's major functioning systems. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are most commonly cited. However, the skeletal system provides key functions. Visitors will learn the key functions this system fulfills as well as learn that bones are alive - most youth have the misconception that their bones are dead.

The exhibit will showcase myriad human and animal bone scenarios in well-developed contexts that will help visitors understand the information presented. Interactive, hands-on activities will be highlighted in Bone Zone. Visitors will see the skeletons of other animals, and play a game where they learn the difference between bone and pseudo-bones, such as scales. In another area, visitors will observe bone cells in a microscope, see a large-scale depiction of a bone, and watch the bone cells at "work." The exciting and innovative 5,000-square-foot exhibit will be showcased at the museum beginning in 2001.

Additional Info

The goals of the Bone Zone project are to:

  1. Develop an interactive, traveling exhibit about bones to promote an understanding of the skeletal system and bone-related diseases among children and the public
  2. Develop curriculum materials and workshops for teachers
  3. Stimulate interest in health science careers. Bone Zone will emphasize interactive hands-on activities

Bone Zone /grants/bone-zone 114 R25RR015662 1 6 IN 2000 09/30/2000 08/31/2002 Children's Museum of Indianapolis 3000 North Meridian, P.O.Box 3000
Indianapolis IN 46206 Department of Education PI BARTLETT KAROL B.A (317) 334-3821 (317) 921-4019 kbartlett@nahec.org Archived website http://web.archive.org/web/20090816170304/http://www.childrensmuseum.org/special_exhibits/bones/entrance.htm

Found in gravesites. Buried in the backyard. Lurking and scaring neighbors at Halloween. The stuff of legendary Hollywood horror films. But, in reality, bones are so much more. They are the living, growing framework of life.

Bone Zone, a dynamic traveling exhibit to be developed by the Children's Museum of Indianapolis, will let visitors explore the mystery inside the body so long hidden by skin, fur or other outside covering. By capitalizing on the fact that visitors bring a portion of the exhibit into the gallery with them (their own bones), these visitors will learn that they too have bones and that their bones live and grow along with them.

A great need for this type of exhibit exists because most people do not identify the skeleton as one of the body's major functioning systems. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are most commonly cited. However, the skeletal system provides key functions. Visitors will learn the key functions this system fulfills as well as learn that bones are alive - most youth have the misconception that their bones are dead.

The exhibit will showcase myriad human and animal bone scenarios in well-developed contexts that will help visitors understand the information presented. Interactive, hands-on activities will be highlighted in Bone Zone. Visitors will see the skeletons of other animals, and play a game where they learn the difference between bone and pseudo-bones, such as scales. In another area, visitors will observe bone cells in a microscope, see a large-scale depiction of a bone, and watch the bone cells at "work." The exciting and innovative 5,000-square-foot exhibit will be showcased at the museum beginning in 2001.

The goals of the Bone Zone project are to:

  1. Develop an interactive, traveling exhibit about bones to promote an understanding of the skeletal system and bone-related diseases among children and the public
  2. Develop curriculum materials and workshops for teachers
  3. Stimulate interest in health science careers. Bone Zone will emphasize interactive hands-on activities

bone, education evaluation /planning, science education, skeletal system; information display, information dissemination, osteocyte, skeletal visualization; animal tissue, human tissue, microscopy