NIH SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP AWARDS

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Development of a Microscope Imaging Station - Phase I

Grant Website

http://www.exploratorium.edu/imaging_station/

Abstract

Working in collaboration with biomedical researchers from universities in the San Francisco area, across the nation, and abroad, the Exploratorium proposes to develop a high-quality microscopic imaging station for use by museum visitors, students, teachers and Internet visitors. This facility will utilize the highest quality optics and state-of-the-art microscopic techniques including biological staining and sophisticated digital recording. A variety of living specimens fundamental to basic biology, human development, the human genome and health-related research will be displayed.

The station will be the lively center of the life sciences' area at the Exploratorium, providing educational content, dramatic imagery and regular demonstrations to reach an audience which ranges from the mildly curious to research scientists. In addition, the Exploratorium will be the first public institution, outside of a few research laboratories, to present live microscopic specimens via video and the Internet in real time. (To date, remote microscopes have generally presented inanimate objects or fixed tissue.) In order to increase student accessibility, subject matter for the imaging station will be integrated into the ongoing middle and high school teacher professional development at the museum. Teachers will be able to use the imaging station to conduct their own experiments, develop classroom explorations, take away images, access the website in their classrooms, or share materials with other teachers.

Additional Info

Working in collaboration with biomedical researchers from universities in the San Francisco area, across the nation, and abroad, this project will develop a microscopic imaging station for museum visitors, students, teachers, and Internet users to view a variety of living specimens, and provide a unique experience for the general public to experience the technology and tools used by biomedical researchers. Subject matter for the imaging station will be integrated into the ongoing middle and high school teacher professional development at the museum. Teachers will be permitted to use the imaging station to conduct their own experiments, develop classroom explorations, take away images, access the website from their classrooms, and share materials with other teachers.

Development of a Microscope Imaging Station - Phase I /grants/development-microscope-imaging-station-phase-i 97 R25RR015627 1 4 CA 2000 09/30/2000 08/31/2003 Exploratorium 3601 Lyon St.
San Francisco CA 94123-1019 PI CARLSON CHARLES C. BA (415) 561-0319 (415) 561-0370 charliec@exploratorium.edu http://www.exploratorium.edu/imaging_station/ http://www.exploratorium.edu/imaging-station/

Working in collaboration with biomedical researchers from universities in the San Francisco area, across the nation, and abroad, the Exploratorium proposes to develop a high-quality microscopic imaging station for use by museum visitors, students, teachers and Internet visitors. This facility will utilize the highest quality optics and state-of-the-art microscopic techniques including biological staining and sophisticated digital recording. A variety of living specimens fundamental to basic biology, human development, the human genome and health-related research will be displayed.

The station will be the lively center of the life sciences' area at the Exploratorium, providing educational content, dramatic imagery and regular demonstrations to reach an audience which ranges from the mildly curious to research scientists. In addition, the Exploratorium will be the first public institution, outside of a few research laboratories, to present live microscopic specimens via video and the Internet in real time. (To date, remote microscopes have generally presented inanimate objects or fixed tissue.) In order to increase student accessibility, subject matter for the imaging station will be integrated into the ongoing middle and high school teacher professional development at the museum. Teachers will be able to use the imaging station to conduct their own experiments, develop classroom explorations, take away images, access the website in their classrooms, or share materials with other teachers.

Working in collaboration with biomedical researchers from universities in the San Francisco area, across the nation, and abroad, this project will develop a microscopic imaging station for museum visitors, students, teachers, and Internet users to view a variety of living specimens, and provide a unique experience for the general public to experience the technology and tools used by biomedical researchers. Subject matter for the imaging station will be integrated into the ongoing middle and high school teacher professional development at the museum. Teachers will be permitted to use the imaging station to conduct their own experiments, develop classroom explorations, take away images, access the website from their classrooms, and share materials with other teachers.

Internet, bioengineering /biomedical engineering, biomedical equipment development, video microscopy; computer human interaction, science education, teacher; bioimaging /biomedical imaging, human subject