NIH SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP AWARDS

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Evolution and Health Traveling Exhibition and Education Programs

Grant Website

http://www.nysci.org/event/the-evolution-health-connection/

Project Description

This project will result in a 1000-square-foot interactive traveling exhibition intended to engage middle and high-school students, educators and the general public in inquiry-based learning about the role of evolution and natural selection in health, illness, prevention and treatment. In addition, teacher development programs and online activities focusing on health issues seen from an evolutionary perspective will be developed and disseminated with the exhibition on a national tour. While there are many museum exhibitions on health, this will be only one of two to take an evolutionary perspective, and the only one to explore the relationship between health and natural selection. The exhibition will increase visitors' comprehension of their own health issues by fostering a better understanding of evolution and natural selection.

Abstract

The New York Hall of Science (NYHOS), in partnership with the University of Michigan (UM), the Miami Museum of Science (MMOS), the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent), and a broad group of Science and Museum Advisors, requests $1,349,349 over five years for a combined Phase I and Phase II NIH SEPA grant to develop, test and travel a new hands-on science exhibition on the subjects of natural selection and human health. With the working title "Evolution and Health," the 1000-square-foot interactive traveling exhibition will engage middle and high-school students, educators and the general public in inquiry-based learning on the role of evolution and natural selection in explanations of health, illness, prevention, and treatment. In addition, teacher development programs and online activities focusing on health issues seen from an evolutionary perspective will be developed by the NYHOS Education staff and disseminated along with the exhibition on its national tour. The project will address the relationship between health and natural selection; while there are many museum exhibitions on health, this will be only one of two to take an evolutionary perspective, and the only one to explore the relationship between health and natural selection. Ultimately, "Evolution and Health" will become a national model for conveying an evolutionary understanding of health, which will be increasingly central to research and public understanding in the coming years. "Evolution and Health" will increase visitors' comprehension of their own health issues by fostering a better understanding of evolution and natural selection. The project will seek to determine whether employing the perspective of natural selection can lead to a deeper understanding of human health.

Evolution and Health Traveling Exhibition and Education Programs /grants/evolution-and-health-traveling-exhibition-and-education-programs 23 1R25RR025123-01 0 2 NY 2008 08/19/2008 07/31/2013 New York Hall of Science 47-01 111th Street
Corona NY 11368 PI WEISS MARTIN M. PhD (718) 699-0005 EXT 356 (718) 699-1341 mweiss@nyhallsci.org http://www.nysci.org/event/the-evolution-health-connection/ http://nysci.org/event/the-evolution-health-connection/

This project will result in a 1000-square-foot interactive traveling exhibition intended to engage middle and high-school students, educators and the general public in inquiry-based learning about the role of evolution and natural selection in health, illness, prevention and treatment. In addition, teacher development programs and online activities focusing on health issues seen from an evolutionary perspective will be developed and disseminated with the exhibition on a national tour. While there are many museum exhibitions on health, this will be only one of two to take an evolutionary perspective, and the only one to explore the relationship between health and natural selection. The exhibition will increase visitors' comprehension of their own health issues by fostering a better understanding of evolution and natural selection.

The New York Hall of Science (NYHOS), in partnership with the University of Michigan (UM), the Miami Museum of Science (MMOS), the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent), and a broad group of Science and Museum Advisors, requests $1,349,349 over five years for a combined Phase I and Phase II NIH SEPA grant to develop, test and travel a new hands-on science exhibition on the subjects of natural selection and human health. With the working title "Evolution and Health," the 1000-square-foot interactive traveling exhibition will engage middle and high-school students, educators and the general public in inquiry-based learning on the role of evolution and natural selection in explanations of health, illness, prevention, and treatment. In addition, teacher development programs and online activities focusing on health issues seen from an evolutionary perspective will be developed by the NYHOS Education staff and disseminated along with the exhibition on its national tour. The project will address the relationship between health and natural selection; while there are many museum exhibitions on health, this will be only one of two to take an evolutionary perspective, and the only one to explore the relationship between health and natural selection. Ultimately, "Evolution and Health" will become a national model for conveying an evolutionary understanding of health, which will be increasingly central to research and public understanding in the coming years. "Evolution and Health" will increase visitors' comprehension of their own health issues by fostering a better understanding of evolution and natural selection. The project will seek to determine whether employing the perspective of natural selection can lead to a deeper understanding of human health.