NIH SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP AWARDS

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Copyright (c) 2012 NIH SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP AWARDS. All rights reserved.

A Partnership in Neuroscience Education

Grant Website

http://www.sepa.duq.edu

Audience

late elementary and middle school students; elementary & middle school teachers; general public

Subjects Addressed

Fundamental principles of neuroscience. Addressing topics of sleep, learning and pain.

Abstract

The "Partnership in Neuroscience Education" will create collections of narrative driven multimedia resources on specific issues that relate to modern neuroscience research, neurological health and health literacy. The multimedia pieces include high definition video animation of peripheral and central nervous system cells and tissues. Videos will also be produced as DVDs, companion video games and interactive media for museum kiosks. Aspects of the stories will be crafted into interactive eBook stories with logic and branching scenarios that teach the user about the fundamental principles and mechanisms of the nervous system. The topics that we plan to develop include, but are not limited, to the following: (1) Pain - something that everyone experiences, but almost no one understands how and where it comes from. (2) Learning and Memory in relationship to both childhood development and healthy insights into the needs of the functioning brain, including sleep. (3) Interactions of the Immune System and the Nervous System. The partnership is realized by the synergistic, coordinated activity of three distinct groups: (A) museums and schools, (B) intellectual partners, (C) production partners. While complex health and science learning goals are typically studied in middle school, we have found that younger students are very capable of understanding and appreciating the underlying fundamental principles when presented in a manner that is both accessible and meaningful to the child. We believe that building a stronger fundamental understanding of neuroscience early on will dramatically enhance the learning that can be achieved later in middle school. An external advisory committee will provide oversight and guidance. Independent evaluators including Rockman et al will work with us to contribute formative and summative evaluations of audience knowledge and attitudes, as well as a small-scale randomized-control trial.

A Partnership in Neuroscience Education /grants/partnership-neuroscience-education-0 R25 OD 016516 PA 2014 04/15/2014 02/28/2019 Duquesne University Duquesne University, Administration Bldg.
600 Forbes Avenue Room 301A
Pittsburgh PA 15282-0001 Biological Sciences Principal Investigator Pollock John Archie PhD (412) 855-4043 pollock@duq.edu http://www.sepa.duq.edu http://www.sepa.duq.edu late elementary and middle school students; elementary & middle school teachers; general public Fundamental principles of neuroscience. Addressing topics of sleep, learning and pain.

The "Partnership in Neuroscience Education" will create collections of narrative driven multimedia resources on specific issues that relate to modern neuroscience research, neurological health and health literacy. The multimedia pieces include high definition video animation of peripheral and central nervous system cells and tissues. Videos will also be produced as DVDs, companion video games and interactive media for museum kiosks. Aspects of the stories will be crafted into interactive eBook stories with logic and branching scenarios that teach the user about the fundamental principles and mechanisms of the nervous system. The topics that we plan to develop include, but are not limited, to the following: (1) Pain - something that everyone experiences, but almost no one understands how and where it comes from. (2) Learning and Memory in relationship to both childhood development and healthy insights into the needs of the functioning brain, including sleep. (3) Interactions of the Immune System and the Nervous System. The partnership is realized by the synergistic, coordinated activity of three distinct groups: (A) museums and schools, (B) intellectual partners, (C) production partners. While complex health and science learning goals are typically studied in middle school, we have found that younger students are very capable of understanding and appreciating the underlying fundamental principles when presented in a manner that is both accessible and meaningful to the child. We believe that building a stronger fundamental understanding of neuroscience early on will dramatically enhance the learning that can be achieved later in middle school. An external advisory committee will provide oversight and guidance. Independent evaluators including Rockman et al will work with us to contribute formative and summative evaluations of audience knowledge and attitudes, as well as a small-scale randomized-control trial.