NIH SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP AWARDS

This document should be rendered in an HTML format with cascading style sheets and JavaScript turned on.

NIH Science Education Partnership Awards Home Page

Skip to Main Content

Skip to Navigation

Copyright (c) 2012 NIH SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP AWARDS. All rights reserved.

Project DiSH (Di=diabetes; S=stroke; H=hypertension) (Phase I)

Abstract

The purpose of project DiSH (Di=diabetes; S=stroke; H=hypertension) is to arouse awareness in middle school students about the dangers of diabetes, stroke, and hypertension, and about lifestyle changes that can help prevent these deadly conditions. These three diseases are of epidemic proportions among minority populations in the US. Students from the most at-risk populations (Native, African, and Hispanic Americans) will be targeted in two urban communities. Project goals are: 1) to train a cadre of teachers in content knowledge and pedagogical skills to enable them to work effectively with middle school students; 2) to assist this cadre of "lead" teachers in mentoring other middle school health and science teachers; 3) to develop awareness and instructional materials to support teachers' work in the classroom; and 4) to involve parents, community support groups, and churches in the awareness process. These goals will be accomplished, first, through a four-week intensive course conducted for 25 teachers each summer by an interdisciplinary team of scientists and educators. Pedagogical techniques grounded in constructivist learning theory and the National Science Education Standards will be modeled for teachers, who will develop additional activities and try them out with their peers during the 4- week intensive course. All instructional activities will be linked to the participating school systems' ongoing curriculum. Howard University faculty will provide follow-up observations, consultations, and training for teachers on their home campuses, and also will prepare them to mentor other teachers. Project staff will develop support materials, including an interactive CD-ROM and a resource notebook of instructional activities derived from the intensive summer course. Parents and community members will be recruited, via existing networks, to participate in community support groups, awareness sessions, and Health Fairs; middle school students will help to organize, pblicize, and conduct these community awareness activities. Evaluation plans include a range of formative and summative measures related to the four major goals, including surveys, observation instruments, interviews, and provisions for informal feedback.

Additional Info

Project DiSH (Di=diabetes; S=stroke; H=hypertension) will develop a school-based program that increases awareness of the medical and lifestyle factors responsible for diabetes, stroke, and hypertension. Currently, these diseases affect a disproportionate number of minorities nationwide. Lead teachers in two predominantly minority school systems will receive training in an intensive summer session at Howard University and then will mentor others. All instructional activities will be linked to the participating school systems- ongoing curriculum. Project staff will develop support materials, including an interactive CD-ROM, and a resource notebook of instructional activities derived from the intensive summer course.

Project DiSH (Di=diabetes; S=stroke; H=hypertension) (Phase I) /grants/project-dish-didiabetes-sstroke-hhypertension-phase-i 107 R25RR014217 0 2 DC 2000 09/30/2000 08/31/2004 Howard University College of Medicine 520 W Street, N.W.
Washington DC 20059 Department of Microbiology PI AUSTIN WILLIE L. PhD (202) 806-4669 (202) 806-4508 waustin@howard.edu

The purpose of project DiSH (Di=diabetes; S=stroke; H=hypertension) is to arouse awareness in middle school students about the dangers of diabetes, stroke, and hypertension, and about lifestyle changes that can help prevent these deadly conditions. These three diseases are of epidemic proportions among minority populations in the US. Students from the most at-risk populations (Native, African, and Hispanic Americans) will be targeted in two urban communities. Project goals are: 1) to train a cadre of teachers in content knowledge and pedagogical skills to enable them to work effectively with middle school students; 2) to assist this cadre of "lead" teachers in mentoring other middle school health and science teachers; 3) to develop awareness and instructional materials to support teachers' work in the classroom; and 4) to involve parents, community support groups, and churches in the awareness process. These goals will be accomplished, first, through a four-week intensive course conducted for 25 teachers each summer by an interdisciplinary team of scientists and educators. Pedagogical techniques grounded in constructivist learning theory and the National Science Education Standards will be modeled for teachers, who will develop additional activities and try them out with their peers during the 4- week intensive course. All instructional activities will be linked to the participating school systems' ongoing curriculum. Howard University faculty will provide follow-up observations, consultations, and training for teachers on their home campuses, and also will prepare them to mentor other teachers. Project staff will develop support materials, including an interactive CD-ROM and a resource notebook of instructional activities derived from the intensive summer course. Parents and community members will be recruited, via existing networks, to participate in community support groups, awareness sessions, and Health Fairs; middle school students will help to organize, pblicize, and conduct these community awareness activities. Evaluation plans include a range of formative and summative measures related to the four major goals, including surveys, observation instruments, interviews, and provisions for informal feedback.

Project DiSH (Di=diabetes; S=stroke; H=hypertension) will develop a school-based program that increases awareness of the medical and lifestyle factors responsible for diabetes, stroke, and hypertension. Currently, these diseases affect a disproportionate number of minorities nationwide. Lead teachers in two predominantly minority school systems will receive training in an intensive summer session at Howard University and then will mentor others. All instructional activities will be linked to the participating school systems- ongoing curriculum. Project staff will develop support materials, including an interactive CD-ROM, and a resource notebook of instructional activities derived from the intensive summer course.

cardiovascular disorder education, diabetes education, diabetes mellitus, education evaluation /planning, educational resource design /development, health education, hypertension, stroke; African American, DVD /CD ROM, Hispanic American, Native American, community, curriculum, learning, longitudinal human study, science education, secondary school, social support network, teacher, urban area; clinical research, health survey, human subject, interview