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Public Health Organization at Morse and Helix High Schools Phase II

Grant Website

http://education.sdsc.edu/teachertech/teacherProjects/projects/tt3/BartHayes/Transfer/SEPA.html

Abstract

During a Phase I study, a Science Education Partnership was established between the UCSD School of Medicine and an urban San Diego high school. UCSD faculty selected for excellence in teaching are grouped into four educational units: Adolescent Health, Biopsychology, Cancer/Genetics, and Infectious Diseases; each unit is assisted by the San Diego Science Alliance, a consortium of over 150 biotechnology corporations, institutions, and foundations, and by UCSD Student Health Advocates, undergraduate UCSD students trained to teach health-related topics. Students enter the program in the 10th grade and receive didactic training in all four units. In the 11th grade, students choose a specific unit and participate in small group seminars and in field trips relevant to their unit; in addition, students present a talk on a health topic of their choice. In the 12th grade, students present their talks to 5th-9th grade students, but only after careful review of the talks by UCSD faculty and high school and elementary school teachers. Thus, information the students have learned is disseminated to younger students and the program incorporates a carefully- supervised peer teaching model. Analysis of intermediatepoint data suggests the program has successfully increased students' knowledge and interest in health-related careers. We have extended the program to a second urban high school and during Phase II we will continue to evaluate the full three year program to a second urban high school and during Phase II we will continue to evaluate the full three year program but we will also determine the efficacy of a one or two year program. In addition, a public health organization will be established to allow the peer teaching paradigm to be expanded widely by having students generate educational materials to be provided to other schools. These materials will teach students about health issues, will demonstrate to schools how to set up similar public health organizations, and will prvide teachers detailed descriptions of strategies to integrate health- related issues into biology, chemistry, and coordinated science classes. As a result of data generated during the Phase I study, a parent education program and a student summer research program will be added to the partnership.

Additional Info

This Phase II project is a collaboration between the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine and two San Diego High Schools; Morse High School (with more than 90 percent minority students), and Helix High School (with approximately 50 percent minority students). A public health organization will be established to disseminate student-produced materials to other schools and develop strategies for teachers to integrate health-related issues into high school science courses. The project will also include a parent education program, and a summer research program for minority youth to work in laboratories under the mentorship of a health care professional. The program is grouped into four educational units: Adolescent Health, Biopsychology, Cancer/Genetics, and Infectious Diseases.

Public Health Organization at Morse and Helix High Schools Phase II /grants/public-health-organization-morse-and-helix-high-schools-phase-ii 90 R25RR012389-2 0 3 CA 2001 07/09/2001 06/30/2004 University of California San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, Dept. 0934
La Jolla CA 92093 The Regents of the University of California PI BOSS GERRY R. MD (858) 534-8805 (858) 534-1421 gboss@ucsd.edu http://education.sdsc.edu/teachertech/teacherProjects/projects/tt3/BartHayes/Transfer/SEPA.html http://education.sdsc.edu/teachertech/teacherProjects/projects/tt3/BartHayes/Transfer/SEPA.html

During a Phase I study, a Science Education Partnership was established between the UCSD School of Medicine and an urban San Diego high school. UCSD faculty selected for excellence in teaching are grouped into four educational units: Adolescent Health, Biopsychology, Cancer/Genetics, and Infectious Diseases; each unit is assisted by the San Diego Science Alliance, a consortium of over 150 biotechnology corporations, institutions, and foundations, and by UCSD Student Health Advocates, undergraduate UCSD students trained to teach health-related topics. Students enter the program in the 10th grade and receive didactic training in all four units. In the 11th grade, students choose a specific unit and participate in small group seminars and in field trips relevant to their unit; in addition, students present a talk on a health topic of their choice. In the 12th grade, students present their talks to 5th-9th grade students, but only after careful review of the talks by UCSD faculty and high school and elementary school teachers. Thus, information the students have learned is disseminated to younger students and the program incorporates a carefully- supervised peer teaching model. Analysis of intermediatepoint data suggests the program has successfully increased students' knowledge and interest in health-related careers. We have extended the program to a second urban high school and during Phase II we will continue to evaluate the full three year program to a second urban high school and during Phase II we will continue to evaluate the full three year program but we will also determine the efficacy of a one or two year program. In addition, a public health organization will be established to allow the peer teaching paradigm to be expanded widely by having students generate educational materials to be provided to other schools. These materials will teach students about health issues, will demonstrate to schools how to set up similar public health organizations, and will prvide teachers detailed descriptions of strategies to integrate health- related issues into biology, chemistry, and coordinated science classes. As a result of data generated during the Phase I study, a parent education program and a student summer research program will be added to the partnership.

This Phase II project is a collaboration between the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine and two San Diego High Schools; Morse High School (with more than 90 percent minority students), and Helix High School (with approximately 50 percent minority students). A public health organization will be established to disseminate student-produced materials to other schools and develop strategies for teachers to integrate health-related issues into high school science courses. The project will also include a parent education program, and a summer research program for minority youth to work in laboratories under the mentorship of a health care professional. The program is grouped into four educational units: Adolescent Health, Biopsychology, Cancer/Genetics, and Infectious Diseases.

high school students; medical school; undergraduate students; infectious diseases; cancer; genetics; biosocial problems; adolescent issues; nutrition; peer teaching