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San Diego State University SEPA Program

Grant Website

http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~sepa/

Abstract

This is a revised proposal in which San Diego State University (SDSU) College of Sciences and College of Education are requesting support for developing a Phase I SEPA pipeline program with a specific focus on teacher development, student enrichment, technology infusion, and parent involvement in selected K-12 schools in the Southbay area of San Diego County. The goal of the proposed Phase I SEPA program is to develop a pipeline training model in the biomedical sciences for 300 minority and disadvantaged K-12 students and 300 parents each year through teacher development, curriculum enrichment and parent involvement. Four major components will be developed over the 3 -year grant period: 1) teacher development: 30 K-12 teachers will be trained; K-6 teachers will participate in sessions on "new approaches in teaching life sciences," and 7th - 12th grade teachers will be trained in hands-on lecture and laboratory exercises in areas of cell biology, genetics, and physiology in years 1, 2, and 3, respectively; 2) student enrichment: science and mathematics curricula will be enriched as a result of teacher development, and additional science activities will be offered; 3) infusion of technology for teachers and students; and 4) a parent involvement will be developed aimed at parent participation in student academic achievement. The program will be a partnership among the SDSU Biology Department in the College of Sciences, the San Diego Mathematics Project (SDMP) in the Colleges of Education and Sciences, selected K-12 schools, and Cox Communications of San Diego. The major outcomes of the project are: 1) a long-term partnership with science teachers in selected K-12 schools; 2) improved teaching skills in critical gate-keeping courses in cell biology, chemistry, and mathematics in the schools; 3) the use of current computer technology in classrooms and biological sciences laboratories; 4) parents' realization of the importance of science training of students; and 5) a increased number of high school graduates will meet new federal and state performance standards in science and mathematics and enter college as highly competitive science majors.

Additional Info

The goal of this program is to develop a pipeline training model in the biomedical sciences for 150 to 200 minority and disadvantaged K-12 students each year, through teacher development, curriculum enrichment, and parent involvement. This project is a partnership among the Biology Department in SDSU-s College of Science, the San Diego Mathematics Project in the SDSU College of Education, the San Diego Elementary Institute of Science, K-12 schools, and Cox Communications of San Diego. This program will foster long-term partnerships with teachers to improve teaching skills in critical courses such as cell biology, chemistry, and math; and, technology infusion in classrooms and biological sciences laboratories. The developed materials will be disseminated in either print or an electronic media format.

San Diego State University SEPA Program /grants/san-diego-state-university-sepa-program 91 R25RR012391 1 1 CA 1998 07/01/1998 06/30/2002 San Diego State University 5500 Companile Drive
San Diego CA 92182-4614 PI ALFRED LARRY PhD (619) 235-8744 (619) 235-8745 lalfred@sunstroke.sdsu.edu OTHER CONTACT PAUOLINI PAUL http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~sepa/ http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~sepa/

This is a revised proposal in which San Diego State University (SDSU) College of Sciences and College of Education are requesting support for developing a Phase I SEPA pipeline program with a specific focus on teacher development, student enrichment, technology infusion, and parent involvement in selected K-12 schools in the Southbay area of San Diego County. The goal of the proposed Phase I SEPA program is to develop a pipeline training model in the biomedical sciences for 300 minority and disadvantaged K-12 students and 300 parents each year through teacher development, curriculum enrichment and parent involvement. Four major components will be developed over the 3 -year grant period: 1) teacher development: 30 K-12 teachers will be trained; K-6 teachers will participate in sessions on "new approaches in teaching life sciences," and 7th - 12th grade teachers will be trained in hands-on lecture and laboratory exercises in areas of cell biology, genetics, and physiology in years 1, 2, and 3, respectively; 2) student enrichment: science and mathematics curricula will be enriched as a result of teacher development, and additional science activities will be offered; 3) infusion of technology for teachers and students; and 4) a parent involvement will be developed aimed at parent participation in student academic achievement. The program will be a partnership among the SDSU Biology Department in the College of Sciences, the San Diego Mathematics Project (SDMP) in the Colleges of Education and Sciences, selected K-12 schools, and Cox Communications of San Diego. The major outcomes of the project are: 1) a long-term partnership with science teachers in selected K-12 schools; 2) improved teaching skills in critical gate-keeping courses in cell biology, chemistry, and mathematics in the schools; 3) the use of current computer technology in classrooms and biological sciences laboratories; 4) parents' realization of the importance of science training of students; and 5) a increased number of high school graduates will meet new federal and state performance standards in science and mathematics and enter college as highly competitive science majors.

The goal of this program is to develop a pipeline training model in the biomedical sciences for 150 to 200 minority and disadvantaged K-12 students each year, through teacher development, curriculum enrichment, and parent involvement. This project is a partnership among the Biology Department in SDSU-s College of Science, the San Diego Mathematics Project in the SDSU College of Education, the San Diego Elementary Institute of Science, K-12 schools, and Cox Communications of San Diego. This program will foster long-term partnerships with teachers to improve teaching skills in critical courses such as cell biology, chemistry, and math; and, technology infusion in classrooms and biological sciences laboratories. The developed materials will be disseminated in either print or an electronic media format.

curriculum, education evaluation /planning, elementary school, science education, secondary school, teacher, teaching; academic achievement, cell biology, chemistry, computer, educationally disadvantaged, ethnic group, genetics, mathematics, parent, physiology, training